Sam:
We’re here in Melbourne, Victoria and I’m about to meet with my mate, Rex. Rex and I have got a bit of a chequered history. He’s a kitchen designer. I’m an architect. He thinks he knows everything about design and I’m pretty sure that I’ve got a bit of a greater understanding. We’re going to go through a bunch of different strategies and different projects for Rex to try and prove to me that he really knows about design.
Sam:
So you’re going to show me a kitchen later, Rex?
Rex:
Yes.
Sam:
But first, I want to see your intent behind the design. You’ve pulled the plans out for me. You can draw plans, I’ll give you that, but I’m not sure if you’re much of a designer. Talk me through the design for this kitchen.
Rex:
Well, this is a 50-60 year-old building in Surrey Hills, young family, two adults, two children. Wanted to have a nice modern home. Bought and owned property in a great area. We’ve got four or five rooms, turn of a large area so that we can cook and we can entertain and we can talk to people, and the layout of the kitchen tends to sort of show that.
Sam:
Now you’ve brought a little bit of Beyonce into this mate. She’s a bit curvalicious. I feel that that’s a bit 90s. What’s your justification of bringing all these curves into the kitchen?
Rex:
I would actually disagree with you Sam, because I think rectilinear design was very big through the early part of this century. Pretty sad to say that, isn’t it? That we’re already into a new century.
Sam:
It would have happened to you a couple of times, ain’t it, Rex?
Rex:
Thanks very much. What we are looking at today is the architecture genuinely and interior design. It’s the same thing. It’s going back to more organic forms; softer, free-flowing forms, and we can see that in a lot of the buildings that are being designed and built around the city today. It’s about softness.
Sam:
Here we are Rex, the first kitchen. You haven’t quite convinced me yet. A lot we talked about back in the show room. Traditionally where the kitchen is, you have the big floating island bench and you have all your prep area back. Now this is very different where we’ve got this big floating island bench, but we’ve got a pantry at the back.
Rex:
Well, basically the reason for that was, you’re thinking about this house and the way we’ve done it, we have two cooks. Both the husband and the wife like to cook. We’ve got a preparation area that can be there, it can also be here. We’ve got two elements along here. Normally in a galley kitchen, you have a taller, maybe either end as a frame, bench in between, hot plate over there. Cooks like to be able to face their guests or the pan when they’re cooking. That’s why the hot plate is here. That’s made it a bit bigger than maybe normal. And I think it’s rather nice because if I’m preparing here, I’ve got my fridge and freezer there. But essentially it’s about having the access to everything right there where you’re working.
Rex:
I used Corian. Corian is known as a solid surface stone. One of its great attributes is the fact that within reason you can bend it. This curve is made up of three pieces, not one great big piece. But the other thing about solid surface stone, Corian, is the fact we can weld any joints outside the joints. It simply disappear.
Sam:
This is it, Rex. End of episode one. I’m going to give you one point, but I’ve got three more to go. Next week, we’re going to have a chat about finishes in the kitchen.
Rex:
Yes, we have a lovely kitchen we’re going to look at next week. It’s actually simply a black and white kitchen, but it looks sensational. You’ll be impressed.