Speaker 1:
Rex has been in the industry for 137 years now.
Rex:
Now I’ve been in the industry 48 years.
Speaker 1:
Rex installed the kitchen in Sydney Opera House.
Rex:
We have worked all over Australia but quite obviously and pretty logically the bulk of our business, it’s really and probably about 10 or 15 case of this, the showroom, here in Canterbury.
Speaker 1:
I’m better than Rex.
Rex:
It’s not that I’m better than Sam. I have a different skill set from Sam. I go after a specific room and I make that room work for the client.
Speaker 1:
So I’m going to choose some finishes for what I think would work with this kitchen. First you tell me, Rex, what would you consider when choosing finishes for a kitchen?
Rex:
Well, clearly, obviously, what the client’s brief was, what sorts of colours the client likes. I like to have a look at their home in advance, see what sorts of colours they, as a family, like to use, warm colours, cool colours, [inaudible 00:01:23] tones, et cetera. And out of that, in conjunction with the client, we developed a calyx screen. There’s no absolute hard and fast rule. It’s a matter of what the client’s comfortable with, what’s also probably going to work in the longterm. If it’s being done to show next week, we might use a very contemporary colour scheme. If it’s a kitchen for the next 20 years, we might do something a bit more conservative. It’s a conversation.
Speaker 1:
If I were going to choose the materials and finishes and colours for this heritage-style kitchen, I’d be thinking things like the Laminex Classic Oak. Now I’d like to put that against. I think, we can use something in quite a white tone, but perhaps with the wood grain, as well. And then where are your stone samples, mate? Yeah. Something exactly like this, so a more traditional marble kind of [crosstalk 00:02:05]-
Rex:
[inaudible 00:02:05]. This client doesn’t want traditional in that sense as I said to you before. This client wants something that is fairly contemporary, suits the home, certainly fits the house aesthetically, but isn’t necessarily continuing its architectural theme from 1990. What I’ve chosen is this one here. It’s fairly contemporary. These are tow new Laminex colours from their absolute [crosstalk 00:02:29].
Speaker 1:
Looks like the zebra. We’ll call it the Zebra, black and white.
Rex:
And you can call it the Zebra or calling whatever. If you’re a Melbourne person here, there you go. The idea behind this is to provide something very striking, something very contemporary, very much on trend, which it is, but also something which works with a young family, which these Absolute Mat products do because they don’t show fingerprints.
Speaker 1:
I’m going to have to tell you, Rex, you’re wrong. You’re going to go back to at least minus 76 in the point system.
Rex:
Fortunately, the number of times you told me I’m wrong, the number of times I’ve proven to be right, you’ll probably find this another one of those occasions.
Speaker 1:
Let’s go and have a look at it.
Rex:
You’re right. Let’s do that.
Speaker 1:
I really don’t like you, Rex, because you’ve gone and proven me wrong here. I just didn’t believe that we could have this stark contemporary kitchen in a heritage home. We’ve got these beautiful details of the corners. We’ve got the beautiful pine floors. I’m like, “No, we need something that respects that a little bit more.” But in this space, I hate to say it, I think you’re right. I don’t think you’re 100% right, but I think you’re right.
Rex:
You couldn’t say I was 100% right if it killed you. That’s… What we were trying to do is to bring this property into the 21st century and I guess, given the client’s brief, it’s the sorts of things that they wanted, it satisfies that bridge really, really well.
Speaker 1:
So you went with the mass and you’ve got the stone bench tops. Tell us about those products.
Rex:
Well, basically, all of the mat laminate’s that are available now, laminates have a great range of them, they’re really, really good. They are a very durable material, but in the case of this particular kitchen, we really wanted to juxtapose white and black into a traditional home and we think it really does give it a lovely contemporary feeling.
Speaker 1:
So you’re saying back at the showroom, you like to integrate a whole lot of technology in kitchens.
Rex:
It’s not that I’m mad keen on technology, but rather there are times when it’s very appropriate. And one of the strong demands in the marketplace today, architecturally, in a whole range of areas is clean lines, no protrusions, that sort of thing. Here we have a kitchen with no handles and, as a result, how do we open the doors? Well, if we have a look over here, Blum have an excellent product range which they call SERVO-DRIVE. SERVO-DRIVE allows you to simply have an electric motor, that you’d touch the door and the door opens. You want to close the door? I’m not an 8-foot giant, so how do I get up there? I can’t. But there’s a WiFi button here. I press the WiFi button and it [crosstalk 00:04:56].
Speaker 1:
It’s the WiFi on it, mate. It’s connected to the internet.
Rex:
We asked. No, not really. It just to its own little computer.
Speaker 1:
What I love about this, mate, this high ceiling allows for this, doesn’t it? It’s really working with the volume. But you’ve got that black block running through the glass in the middle and the white.
Rex:
Yeah. And I like the fact that it’s darker going to light, which is again accenting the heart of the room.
Speaker 1:
So here you are, Rex. You’ve got two from two. We’ve talked about kitchen design. You’ve nailed me on that. We’ve talked about finishes. You’ve nailed me on that. So next week, we’re going to talk about storage.
Rex:
You might remember a conversation we had a few months ago. I certainly do. I sometimes question whether you believe in function. You like the big picture. “It looks awesome.” “Does it work?” “I don’t know, but it looks good.” Next week, we’re going to talk about storage. There are many spaces in the house where storage is critically important, and that’s really what we’re going to focus on next week.